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031•366 • 2016 • Virga

January 31, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

Below are 2 versions of this image, processed and Straight Out Of Camera JPEG conversion, which helps illustrate the reason I always shoot RAW. 

The processed image is closer to what I saw.

My Lightroom 6 Processing is pretty straight forward for this image. Change camera profile to Landscape, change white balance to daylight, add medium contrast, add clarity, adjust shadows and highlights, set black and white points, add some vibrance. Where I added extra processing was a graduated filter in the sky to the horizon line, I then erased some of the grad filter mask on the ridges, brought down exposure 1 stop, add a bit more clarity and cool the white balance to bring out the dark blues in the clouds. Next was crop tool to straighten the horizon and crop to 1x2 aspect ratio.

 

Random Factoid • IF you do all your post-processing work well and run test prints (I suggest Lustre surface for these). The lab that Costco uses for canvas prints is really nice. In panorama they offer both 1x2 (16x32") and 1x3 (16x48") canvas prints. Make sure to upload your test prints and your canvas image file as sRGB for consistency.

Don't use your local Costco color profiles, sRGB in this case will give better end results.

Processed in Lightroom 6

 

JPEG conversion from SOOC RAW file in Lightroom 6

 

View from the makeshift bench on Humboldt Trail at the spot we call Bear Hill (because at this spot a few years ago, we saw a young bear charging toward us).

Shawn and I went for the 6 mile -/+ 1,000' vertical, Humboldt > Guardians > 10 Mile House > Annie Bidwell > Bloody Pin > Guardians > Humboldt Trails loop.

Our hike started with finding a raccoon carcass, completely eaten, on Humboldt Trail. All the water falls were flowing and the views as always were spectacular. As a bonus for the day, we were hailed on twice and rained on.

"In meteorology, virga is an observable streak or shaft of precipitation that falls from a cloud but evaporates or sublimes before reaching the ground.[1] At high altitudes the precipitation falls mainly as ice crystals before melting and finally evaporating; this is often due to compressional heating, because the air pressure increases closer to the ground. It is very common in the desert and in temperate climates. In North America, it is commonly seen in the Western United States and the Canadian Prairies. It is also very common in the Middle East, Australia and North Africa.
Virga can cause varying weather effects, because as rain is changed from liquid to vapor form, it removes heat from the air due to the high heat of vaporization of water. In some instances, these pockets of colder air can descend rapidly, creating a dry microburst which can be extremely hazardous to aviation. Conversely, precipitation evaporating at high altitude can compressionally heat as it falls, and result in a gusty downburst which may substantially and rapidly warm the surface temperature. This fairly rare phenomenon, a heat burst, also tends to be of exceedingly dry air.
Virga also has a role in seeding storm cells whereby small particles from one cloud are blown into neighboring supersaturated air and act as nucleation particles for the next thunderhead cloud to begin forming.[citation needed]
The word is derived from Latin virga meaning "twig" or "branch"."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virga


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